Skip to main content

About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CSPAN 20
CSPAN2 12
CNNW 11
MSNBCW 11
FBC 10
CNBC 8
KGO (ABC) 6
KNTV (NBC) 6
KQED (PBS) 6
KPIX (CBS) 5
KQEH (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 128
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 128 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the economy. the washington post writes that the white house is ratcheting up pressure to avoid the fiscal cliff. on c-span tonight, we will bring you some of the house and senate debate from august of 2011, when congress passed the budget control act that triggered cuts to take effect on january 1. we will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said w
. warning the whole economy could be at risk because of that. lauren: which companies make the naughty and nice list. some retailers that were very good and some that should be pulled. david: let's tell you what drove the market with the "data download." stocks pushing higher with nasdaq and s&p posting four straight days of gains. hewlett-packard led the dow higher. the top performing sectors, while utilities lag. consumer confidence soaring to a five-year high, consumer sentiment index edging up nearly 30% higher than just a year ago. fewer americans filing first-time applications from plymouth benefits last week as impact subsided a little bit. weekly jobless claims fell a seasonally adjusted 410,000. lauren: the pits of the cme joining us, giving their strategy for protecting yourself from the potential fall off the fiscal cliff. the markets were kind of a honeymoon today. where the traders not concerned about the fiscal cliff? what went on? >> the fiscal cliff was so widely expected is becoming a non-event at this point. the market managed to eke out a gain today. the european iss
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
in the southern city of kochin represents the booming economy. and with growth projections here as high as 7% for the year, the expanding indian market for goal could push prices past $2500 an ounce. "buy it, keep it, buy 24-carat gold, put it in a locker, and when you need money, turn around and sell it and make good money on it." > > and come to umreth to do it. "yes, come to my shop!" reporting from india, paul eggers, first business news. the indian government tightly regulates the gold market by testing jewelery for quality. chokesee believes this is a positive, because it helps protect customers from low- quality pieces. an overwhelming number of parents in the u.s. believe their children are growing up without learning valuable life skills such as how to manage their money. as many as 7 out of 10 parents expect these lessons to be taught in public school. nathaniel and stacey didomenico's young daughter, arianna, is more ahead of the game than she realizes. "we've already started with our daughter. there are things she wants at the store and we explain that it costs money, we have to
to make a decision and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next el
is to talk about the economy. but i would say something is. romney only emphasized -- very quickly. we cannot run only on an economic message. we have the full conservatives on social issues, on the national security, and on the economy. spent and aspirational. aspirational a mechanism where you are free to go as far as you want to go and to do what you want to do. and you are right about the hispanic community, especially they are very and trunk -- entrepreneurial. guess what. they start liking free government less. >> unfortunately, we're out of time to want to thank you all for coming today. please join me in thanking our panelists for this terrific presentation. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> tonight in primetime we get a closer look at the presidential election. we have from president obama's former campaign manager and republican strategist steve smith. that's and university of delaware and starts at 8 p.m. eastern. here on c-span2, author mark friedman talks about how more baby boomers are entering into a second careers. he's the author of the big shi shift. that's also at 8 p
by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three years, but at a slow pace. the unemployment rate, which peaked at 10% in the fall of 2009, has since come down 2%, to just below 8%. this is a welcome decline, but it has taken a long time to achieve the progress, and the unemployment level is still well above its level prior to the onset of the recession and the level that our colleagues an
's entire economy. we can't afford it and we can't afford to leave it intact. so try as they might, remember the last congress republicans passed a lot of bills out of the house of representatives that tore apart obama care. as even the president calls it now. they didn't go anywhere in the senate and meanwhile, alex, after the thanksgiving break, the principles are expected to get back together to begin negotiating in earnest. as you're right the clock is ticking. just a little bit more than one month to go before the nation heads over that fiscal cliff. al alex? >> 38 days and counting. thanks so much. let's go from the white house to the middle east now. palestinians and israelis are keeping a cease-fire alive. but many call the truce extremely fragile. an attempted border breach threatened the calm yesterday. israeli forces shot and killed a palestinian man. he was one of hundreds testing israeli security at the border. nbc's martin fletcher is live for us in tel aviv. good saturday morning to you, martin. can this shooting jeopardize the cease-fire? and then when does the next phase beg
for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. > uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fed's role in the fiscal cliff negotiations is to communicate. >> tell the world and the individuals in the political establishment that they have to help get their act together or we have a problem, and that notion of preaching from the pulpit that he has is very fundamental. >> susie: is there another role or more of a ro
't heard before. could christmas actually be bad for the economy? d? on black friday, it doesn't matter, as long as we end up here at 5 a.m., or at homedepot.com, starting thursday. where prices have been cut, chopped, and sanded... on the most powerful tools that cut. ...chop... ...and sand. so we, or somebody on our list, can do the same. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. the early bird gets a special buy on a ryobi two-piece lithium-ion kit, just $99. >>> it's being called the thanksgiving creep. a record number of stores are getting a jump-start on the holiday shopping season by opening their doors tonight. nbc's kevin tibbles is live in chicago for us. he's getting ready to shop till he drops, always ready to do the deed for work. so, what you got there? how bad is it going to be out there today? >> alex, if you think i'm going to be in a mall today, you've got me confused with the other 83 million kevin tibbless who aren't in the phone book. but it is thanksgiving. happy thanksgiving to everyone. for those of you who do have that sort of deal bug, well,
period of lower rates further into the future we are not saying we expect the economy to remain weak until 2015. rather, we expect, as we indicated in our statement, that a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economic recovery strengthens. in other words, we want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increased confidence among households and businesses, thereby providing additional support for economic growth and job creation. the u.s. economy continues to be hampered by the lingering effects of the financial crisis on its productive potential and by a number of headwinds that hindered cyclical adjustment of the economy. the federal reserve is doing its part by providing accommodative monetary policy to promote a stronger economic recovery in the context of price stability. as i said before, while monetary policy can help to support economic recovery, it is by no means a panacea for our economic ills. uncertainties ab
that in itself says that when the economy is contracting, there is a competitive advantage to having an education. >> has always struck me with my students. apple would much rather have students with a liberal arts background than a background in computer science or engineering. they are much more adaptable and capable of change. i am not aware of this study, but during the late 1990s, the business higher education forum conducted a study of ceos and see what they sought from college graduates. while they expected some skills, what they were really after was individuals that were committed to continuing having had capacity to continue to learn. not only that they are adapted to change that they can drive change and adapt to an increasingly diverse world. in that sense, it really kind of defines the important part of a liberal education is a background the background for this. the other thing i would mention we really need a liberal arts training before they enter these programs. so i think it really reinforces that. >> i think you are very bright about the data. particularly over the long-term. a
. >> it is doing it now with china and japan. you have to of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises the fundamental question and up in in this myth that economics draws people together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?" during the cold war, you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and it two blew up, you could still have 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment in figuring out how to court made, communicate, due to escalation and talk if things got bad. in this era, when i look at the amount of time -- the obama administration more so than the bush administration, when officials meet throughout the region, and the discussion attempt to correlate with china, there seems to be a lot of effort to try to coordinate. jim steinberg was the fourth member of this panel, looking at the island dispute and said, they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication, miss assessment, and the dangers of that between china and japan. it raises the question of whether or not -- i agree. i know china wants respect
about how enacting comprehensive immigration reform can help on the jobs and economy issue. simply put, immigration reform would create a fair, humane and effective system that levels the playing field for all workers. right now our immigration system doesn't work for anyone but unscrupulous employers. we need to take the power out of the hands of those who are exploiting our current immigration situation and put it back in the hands of workers and fair and honest employers. if all workers have a legal status, employers can't skirt labor laws said they have to pay fair wages and abide the rules. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as the economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in fear of their parents deportation every day of their lives and some of the hardest working and most honorable people in our society should not have to be subject to exploitation and harassment. finally, i would just like to say that i'm truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know that
, we will ask a business expert what fewer shoppers means for the overall economy. rick: shifting gears now overseas, the hamas terrorist group is accusing israel of breaking the ceasefire rules agreed to only a couple of days ago, two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. the shooting death of a palestinian man today could threaten the already-fragile agreement. conor powell is live in jerusalem with the very latest. >> reporter: well, rick, given that the level of trust between israel and hamas is so low, expectations for this ceasefire were even lower. but it appears to have passed its first major hurdle. earlier today several hundred palestinians went to the border between gaza and israel, some reportedly there to check on land across the border in israel, others were, no doubt, hamas sympathizers testing the ceasefire. but as israeli trooped told them to back off from the border area, they refused, and israeli troops opens fire killing one palestinian. both israel and hamas accused the other ofhe ceasefire agreement, but neither side took steps to escal
, we had huge surpluses because of the strong economy over the 1990's and deficit-reduction plans put in place over the 1990's. the government had the choice to spend that on programs, or returned it to tax payers, and the bush administration decided to return the money to taxpayers. over the following year's tax rates were lower. it was renewed in 2010 in a tax deal between president obama and congressional republicans at a time when the economy was weak and the feeling was they could not take an increase in taxes. host: what was the desired effect and did it happen? he called the desired effect was to give people more of their income back, and that happened, as wealthy people got more income back, more moderate income earners got some back. one of the questions is how it effects economic growth, and it is an unresolved area of economic research. did it did help the economy -- did it help the economy? it is hard to say. we had a good economy in the 2000's before the crisis. now we have a huge crisis. on balance, it probably did not help that much. host: can you calculate if jobs were
, it could have serious consequences on the economy. >> i want to ask you both to weigh in on this question. kristen, you do the political angle and neil you give me the nuts and bolts. yesterday john boehner wrote an op-ed calling for the health care law to be part of the negotiations, he wrote in part the president's health care law at the massive, expensive, unworkable program when the national debt exceeds the size of our country's entire economy. we can't afford it, and can't afford to leave it intact. is john boehner right? >> no. look, it's a law that does a lot of things with the health care system. it's not predominantly a fiscal issue, in that that when the government does anything, it affects taxes. if you're the president you have no incentive to allow the health care law to be on the table in these negotiations. maybe on the edges there are a few spending programs you're willing to negotiate over. but in terms of the health insurance mandate and exchanges, all the things in this complicated law that passed two years ago, you're really going to draw the line and say, we're not g
will require to help its economy recover. >> eliot: that is the balancing act that prime minister morsi is trying to effect wait here. in essence for his economy to come back, he knows he needs the united states. he needs peace. a war would be devastating to what long-term he has to care about. is that, in fact, the leverage that secretary of state clinton has with morsi in saying to him you have got to lean on hamas to stop this and somehow we will navigate through this in the coming months but it seems to me that morsi has made himself a central figure in this process. >> well, sure. i suppose the difficulty for president morsi is hamas is the key actor in this equation but obviously there are other groups resident in gaza that perhaps even hamas does not completely control. so when you get to that aspect of assurances, prime minister netanyahu wants a period of calm before he signs a truce. obviously gave that point -- it is very challenging. eliot, the other aspect as your opening clip of hillary clinton underlined is th
of december. what we are seeing is the japanese yen devaluing. one of the things we need for their economy is exports. they have been horrible. look at electronics companies right now, they are really struggling. we're looking at the fiscal cliff, the dollar holding into an 80, 81 range, and it will probably stay there until we start getting closer to the christmas holidays and when it comes to crunch time for the fiscal cliff, let's see how this shakes out. cheryl: i still can't believe the euro is as strong as it has against the dollar considering everything that is going on over there. while our economy seems to be strengthening, how do you explain that? >> there is a flight to safety. people leave europe is going to be able to pull this out. there is a lot of money brought in tinto all of this. you have japan pulling down, the yen is getting weaker and weaker. the flight to safety going to the euro dolla euro dollar and e u.s. dollar. let's wait and see how this plays out on monday, it ought to be very interesting. cheryl: it is never boring. let's go over to the nymex. tom, certainly
a lot of -- >> he's got a cleaner slate than four years ago with an economy. >> start building the sub structure to show actual progress. a debate in the white house is, like, it's a long term thing, health care, for instance, but showing results any time soon to people in need. well, that was the long term game. of course, the stimulus was the short term game, but, still, americans don't feel the effects. some of it is marketing, some of it is real, of a lot of what obama's done. i think the key now is, because of the re-election, he'll actually have time for americans just to go, well, i feel a little better, and it's substantive, it's real. my health insurance -- >> that was true of clinton, and david said in the conversation that clinton adopt seize the reigns of a -- didn't seize the reigns of a second term. >> seized something else instead. [laughter] [applause] >> that was good. >> the whole year before wasting 1997 before the scandal broke will. >> welfare reform -- >> asking dave because we're in biography here. i'm fascinated by them figuring out who they were in childhood. y
. it is is sapping the ability of the american economy to grow and it is topping -- zapping the ability of the average american to rise. until we look at the major core issues that are making the u.s. more attractive to business, we will go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we can get our economy really moving and growing in the long run, these will just occur over and over again. we identified eight areas, as you mentioned, where we find there is broad consensus where we believe these things would really move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two, three, four years. there is some real bipartisan support. the first is the need of a sustainable budget compromise. that is widely accepted by all. two, easing on highly skilled immigration now. yes, when a broader immigration reform, but this is one of the abilities to really move rapidly to inject skills and to the economy and fill jobs badly need to be filled to sustain our growth. it is not a long-term solution and there, but it is a critical step we can take now that would really move the needle. we hav
back on its feet, it involves finding a way to help greece's economy actually return to growth. while some of the terms of the deals were a little more favorable than many had feared, at the end of the day, you have to find a way to help these economies grow. that probably means pausing some of that austerity. >> susie: you talk about it being a favorable deal, and you picture that other troubled companies in europe are saying, i want a deal just like greece got. what does that mean for the european economic recovery? >> i think it certainly complicates things a little bit. there is clearly an issue of moral hazard. many other countries may look to the deal that greece got and say, hey, maybe i can get a similar-type deal. in the end, when we think about what is plaguing personal europe, a lot of it has to do with austerity which has been forced on the economies, which are really, really depressed, and pushes them deeper into the hole. part of what needs to be done moving forward is pausing some of that austerity. you can't go to a country in a very bad recession, and tell them to inc
all of those. but is black friday still good for our economy? does it help? does it create jobs? will it help the obama administration, recession and the unemployment levels, as easy as it is to talk about the ugly aspects of it, what are the positive aspects if any. shop at local small businesses on friday. why not think about buying american-made products and think about keeping your money in your community by buying locally? we'll get to all of that governor eliot spitzer will be l kaing in host of "viewpoint" here on current tv. likewise, film critic allison bails who i'm a big fan of, and she'll be talking about what are some good films that smart politically progressive minded people can go see, and what are some good movies you can take your family to see or escape from your family with. and scott backman will be on. >> i can't wait for that. >> john: yesterday we had dean on, and they do a show together. and scott takes the position where he is very pro israel but not a huge fan of their government. anthony popus will be calling in, and is wal-mart as
cartwright. much larger housing it. one-way ticket about this is that the great growing economy in china per capita carbon emissions levels go up about 100% if they stop at the level of wealthy but hybrid -- out by less than 30%. that's a huge difference. whether or not you live in global warming are worried about the price of gas at the pump, we have a lot to gain by china in the building of rather than a. i think the most important thing for america to do in order to encourage a to have it is to get it some urban policies interpret that means stopping our cities as if they are the ugly stepchildren of america and recognize them for the economic heart line, apart a chance -- the heartland for this country. the american dream can only mean a homeowner in the suburb every means rethinking policies that pay for highways with general tax revenues, driving people to drive longer distances, above all honor city schools which are such critical ingredient for urban success in such a critical problem which despite enormous hard work by people language, mayor menino, like the city council, are so far
convention and james carville reminded me with all the talk about the economy that we don't live in an economy, we live in a society. i care deeply about the society we are creating and i use the word creating on purpose. today community does not happen organically. you have to be very intentional and deliberate about that, and city council is in the midst of a school reassignment process, i have learned quality is subjective, the definition of that. city council is redistricting. i have learned community is subjective. how neighborhoods are defined. i do believe in investing in infrastructure and all those things that would eradicate or mitigate a brain drain, but ultimately, i believe it doesn't matter if we have more affordable housing or better jobs or better schools. if people don't want to live here. that has everything to do with community and the soul of the city. people want to be a part of a city that is diverse and inclusive and welcoming. neighborhood is about social interaction and that is how we build community. in a city like boston that has 22 distinct neighborhoo
this difficult time we have had with the economy. the richest of the rich will have to pay a little bit more to solve the financial problems we have in this country. [inaudible] >> right after the senate majority leader harry reid spoke, republican leaders held their own briefing and ways to find a deal and criticized leader reid's plan. this is 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the president would be -- seems like our friends on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. i think we have a clear sense and opportunity here at the end of the year to do something important for the country. we all know that the most critical steps to be taken are to save the entitlements, which are on an unsustainable path to bankruptcy. there's no better time to begin to fix that problem than right now. so i would hope our friends on the other side can kind of turn off the campaign and get into a cooperative mode here to reach a conclusion. which leads me to make a further observa
an agreement by year's end. such a situation is feared to trigger a plunge in the economy. panetta warned that defense spending will be subject to drastic cuts if lawmakers failed to reach a consensus. >> the worst thing that could happen from my perspective is that they just kick the can down the road. all that would wind up doing is continuing to present a shadow over the defense department and for that matter, the rest of government. >> the defense department is already planning to reduce its budget by about $500 billion over the coming ten years. panetta has voiced concern that further cuts could undermine barack obama's new defense strategy that lays more emphasis on the asia pacific region. >>> japanese officials are scratching their heads about how to deal with sluggish trade. sales to foreign countries have plunged leaving japan in a trade deficit for the fourth straight month. finance ministry officials released preliminary figures shortly before the markets opened. the deficit came in at $6.7 billion. exports fell by 6.5% from a year earlier. exports have fallen five months in a
globally, but here in the united states we're getting answers from the national economy of society and nasa, the guys who put the man on the moon, that's where we're getting our information and where we're getting our policy guidance and the solutions to move forward. let's discuss it, the united states, if we have a carbon tax in the united states of some sort, we tax emissions so we have fewer emissions and you think that makes a really, rail big difference to the temperature of the planet? >> a huge difference because we've got to go after the industrial carbon pollution that's warming the planet and paying a heavy price. this pushed the price tag on the problem and we know where the pollution is, let's go get it. >> one last question, i'm sure you're familiar with the study by the britain's meteorologist office. no increase in the global temperature in a 16 year period. i think it was from mid 1990's until 2010, 2011. and that's what the british office said flat-out. what do you make of that? >> well, with great respect, i'm not familiar with the report. what i can say is here in this c
travel is still popular even though the economy is sluggish. in terms of the tickets themselves yes they are up from earlier this month. if you're afraid of the big jumps we are still a holiday away from that. have a listen. >> over thanksgiving prices were relatively flat compared to thanksgiving 2011. where we do see a little bit of a jump is when we get to christmas. we see airfare prices 8% higher than we saw last christmas. >> maybe it's a big headache for folks that are traveling today is the number of canceled and delayed flights because of fog in the chicago area. it really impaired midway and owe hair. it's a domino system. a lot of the regional flights, everything you see up here in yellow is at least delayed. a lot of the canceled flights are from the midwest, springfield, missouri, and other points in the midwest. make sure you check with your airline if you're traveling today. heather: that is a lot of yellow on the screen. folks were waiving to you in the line, they didn't look some aggravated. hatch of the thanksgiving travelers will go by car instead. what is the imp
consumer giving the economy a big lift or will fears about the fiscal cliff get in the way? a roundtable discussion is up next. you saw sears and kmart president kick off the open at the nasdaq. can his store ring up strong sales this holiday season? we'll head to break and look at this morning's early movers on wall street led by best buy up 1.6%. with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see what criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the strategies and narrow down to exactly those stocks you want to follow. i'm mark allen of fidelity investments. the expert strategies feature is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so
the modern economy, you'll hear something like the following phrase. well, the last 30 years of the american political economy has been very good for consumers, but bad for workers. well, it's not like there's two parts of me. it's just the same person who is doing both of those things. the question is in total, are you better off. and jennifer is someone who runs a small business and is in the world of retail. i want to hear what your thoughts on all of this right after we take this quick break. >>> that's the video of the walmart in georgia on black friday that we were debating whether we wanted to show. so we thought -- >> we say voyeurism -- >> well, no, we said we're only going to show it if we unpack a little bit rather than just kind of throw it out and look at those crazy people. jessica, not jennifer. we're 14 minutes into the show, i got one person who wasn't arrested saying was arrested. what was your take away from the walmart action? >> i honestly think it's inspiring. we were talking about this a moment ago. i think like the occupy movement, even if it's a sort of a symbolic mo
? >> it's a very bifurcated economy today with the consumer. you have high end consumers that are still feeling pretty good but in very basic every day needs like food as well as basic services, et cetera, people no matter what economic strata they're in, they are trying to save on those basics. >> explains a lot about where we are. >> took my breath away. what he's saying is there's a huge percentage of people trying to pay for dinner and dinner is tough to come by and you forget about that on a fiscal cliff discussion that will be even more difficult for people to pay for dinner and he did this acquisition because he knows people are hurting in this country. >> there's the opening bell. s&p at the top of your screen. here's big board at that. prosperity bank shares marking transfer from the nasdaq and over at the nasdaq. >> you're talking about dinner. we are having discussion about whole foods under pressure of late. the company missed. the cfo resigned. never a good thing for a company when you hear a cfo resigning. stock down 18.25%. smaller cap company. it's 2.9 billion. decent ac
that central bankers can't rescue the u.s. economy if it goes over the fiscal cliff. paul is president of financial capital. given that we're talking about this so much with these guys not around, all we do is we keep showing how much time we have as it's ticking down. when they do get back, paul, how do you think that the deal looks if they do put one together, and do they get it done? >> good morning, and happy thanksgiving to y'all. we all know it's getting done, whether it gets done before christmas or in january, a deal's going to get done. i think also everyone knows taxes are unfortunately -- taxes are going to go up. i don't know it's going to be at the 250 level. maybe at the 500 or million-dollar level. but taxes are going to go up and expenses are going to get cut. so we all wish they would stop the jawboning and positioning and politicking, sit in a room with dulls, both give in a little bit and move on. but they're going to push and push and push and the markets will push a deal to get it done. >> so if you were trying to decide what to do, would you just stand pat with eq
as the eu and imf agree on terms of debt sustainability. where does it leave the greek economy which has already shrunk by nearly a fifth? >>> and warren buffett on tv this morning saying he wouldn't sell a single share of stock even if he was guaranteed the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff. just wait until you hear who he thinks should be the treasury secretary. >> we'll begin of course with the deal of the day. conagra foods has agreed to acquire ralcorp for $5 billion. $90 a share in cash. 28% premium to the closing price on monday. kayla tausche reported on potential for a deal between the two companies back in 2011. it creates the largest private label food company in north america. this is a big deal. >> yes, it is. it's big in size in terms of what we've seen in this market. look how excited he is. and they finally got it done. it's been one as you pointed out that was around in 2011. they couldn't get it done. that is conagra. they walked away. ralcorp stock price fell dramatically. they split the post cereal division from ralcorp. the two trade separately. so you did have a compan
for the workplace. we are not going to be the world's most innovative economy. second, in some ways, more surprising for me, it was brought to us by the former chief of secretary of the army, who talked about the problems in our education system and the relationship to the armed forces. the inability of some 70% of americans actually qualified for service in the armed forces ought to be a red flag for anyone. now, yes, there are other reasons for that. incarceration, obesity, but a fair amount of it is that the people can't pass the basic skills test to get into the military. so just imagine a country -- a developed country, a powerful country in the world. and we can't get the basic tasks. analyzing data secretary of state is realizing how few people how -- how they learn foreign languages, the fact that we don't have people who are prepared to go into the intelligence agency and we are lobbying ourselves appellate in literally the national security infrastructure of the country. so most importantly, it is a tragedy that people will not be prepared for a good job and will therefore have nowhere els
of the u.s. economy. james has the latest on the planned walmart workers strike but, first, live from chicago. steve, hour the so-called brick and mortar stores versus online retailers? >>reporter: the overall retail picture looks like this, the national federations of retailers believes there will be a 4 percent increase in holiday spending this year over last year. in terms of the brick and mortar physical stores there was a movement away from some of the these just because of the size of the crowds. some folks cannot go out and battle the crowds but we have seen a return of folks who swore off the early bird shopping. >> i was going to go online and do my shopping from there but it worked out. >>reporter: there are a lot of folks that do online shopping and that is growing. one estimate is in holiday online shopping will be up 17 percent and 4 percent overall. >>gregg: the people working the stores. any trouble finding or keeping workers there? >>reporter: they have to go weeks and months to get folks prepared. we stopped in with a target in chicago area and they have worked on hav
. they are going to buy smart phones. i think the global economy's -- the emerging market economy will pick us all up if we do get picked up. david: they hope the fed picks them up more than they've already done so. there's worry signs there's no end to the printing. john williams in which he told the journal, quote, "in terms of how far you can go, i don't think we're anywhere near that kind of limit." it seems like they are going the whole distance. >> absolutely. look, this is not -- this has been coming on for a long time. you're a student of history, going back to the roman empire, germany, england, any major, you know, economic entity in the world. david: look how the runs ended. forgive me for interrupted, but look how they ended. super inflation is usually the way these things end. >> well, we hope eventually, right now, a dysfunctional government in europe, united states as well as in japan, and it's too tempting to print money to solve all of these things, and as long as the markets are willing to, you know, absorb the printing of the capital, things will continue to move forward. anythi
get enough of a recovery. i think we need a deal on the economy and on the budget and the debt, but i think until we get that, we need to have unemployment -- >> we have extended food stamps to 47 million people. we have extended unemployment benefits for up to two years and may extend them again. extended reach of earned income tax credit which is a massive check in the mail to millions of people every january. >> who are working and earning money and rewarding them for work. stuart: most corrupt of all government handout programs. >> it shouldn't be corrupt. it was a good idea and started by ronald reagan. stuart: you would not change the safety net as it now stands? >> i would try to make it work more efficiently but would not change it. stuart: you don't think there's anything wrong with a nation which has all of these millions of people, half the population taking something from the government. >> i think there is a lot right about that in an economic time of devastation. we can make the programs work better, but the programs shouldn't be eliminated because there's corruption whe
-they are not going to get rid of. they need a local economy expanding and growing and you can go to grand rapids, have you been to grand rapids? the economy is booming. they are encouraging it to do so. they have got the recipe for growth that detroit lost her long ago. [talking over each other] >> they have held back the growth of the city -- dave: there are some cities i could point to where the mayors are not on the up and up but -- a city that had a lot of corruption, why can't he get the message? liz: they only hold back thirty million to hang over the head. we are going to hold back $30 million, i don't think that is enough of a push to get going. dave: if you think black friday is the best day to get deals think again. if you want to save money you should wait it out. find out why after the break. it is your money. dave: stocks are higher. the dow jones industrials are up about 88 points. it is a shortened trading session. market's close at 1:00. an informal session. traders are bringing their kids to the floor and volume is expected to be light but there are stocks making big moves. will
are not spread across the board. the economy would take a hit of $500 billion, probably sending the country back boo recession. i get what the white house is saying and what people like patty murray are saying about how we should negotiate this and whether it's a cliff or a slope. >> it's a financial cliff claven. >> slope. >> i think even if it is a slope, if we go over the fiscal slope, it will do a lot of damage. >> right it could -- the markets will react, freak out. >> that's where the damage will be done. >> i love politico, a growing block of emboldened emboldened liberals. [ screaming ] >> say they're not afraid to watch defense spending get gouged. [ scream ] >> stephanie: if republicans captain see their way toward additional revenues then we're better off going over the cliff and readdressing this with a better congress in january. >> it's the republicans holding the country hostage. >> they're saying it's more of a slope where the economic effects will be handled gradually. we're going to have a whole new congress. >> more democrats. >> we have the technology. we can make them better
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 128 (some duplicates have been removed)